Sunday, December 5, 2021
HomeBold, brilliant, passionate: Prayers, praises rain a day after Lyndon's death

Bold, brilliant, passionate: Prayers, praises rain a day after Lyndon’s death

BACOLOD CITY, Negros Occidental, Philippines – Praises and prayers started to pour today a day after popular lawyer, and civic and religious leader Lyndon P Caña passed away in a private hospital days after he confirmed he was brought in to recover from COVID.

Today, the Negros Island House of Prayer held the first necrological service for Caña who it described as one of its “fiercest generals” in the prayer movement.

With former and sitting officials already crossing party lines since yesterday to praise Caña, sitting Mayor Evelio Leonardia described him as one who could be a “determined but compassionate adversary, one who tempered his actions with discernment.”

Leonardia, who heads the ruling Grupo Progreso party, had numerous disagreements with Caña who was an independent councilor for two terms.

Among their points of contention was the port agreement between the city and the Bacolod Real Estate Development Corporation.

Caña was appointed to head the city council review of the contract.

In 2006, he was chosen as one of the Ten Outstanding Councilors of the Philippines.

Partylist group Citizens Battle Against Corruption or CIBAC also remembered Caña.

“Atty. Caña devoted his personal life and professional career in helping CIBAC wage a war against corruption by promoting good governance and making transparency and accountability real in the government. He did not stand quietly in the midst of immorality, indecency and the utter disregard for Filipino values in the many facets of our society,” Sen. Joel Villanueva said in a statement.

Villanueva formerly represented CIBAC in the Philippine House of Representatives.

His father, Eddie Villanueva, ran for president and Caña was one of his strongest supporters and campaigners in the province.

Julius D. Mariveles
An amateur cook who has a mean version of humba, the author has recently tried to make mole negra, the Mexican sauce he learned by watching shows of master chef Rick Bayless. A journalist since 19, he has worked in the newsrooms of radio, local papers, and Manila-based news organizations. A stroke survivor, he now serves as executive editor of DNX.
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