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HomeBREAKINGBREAKING: PAGASA places northern Negros under Storm Signal No. 2

BREAKING: PAGASA places northern Negros under Storm Signal No. 2

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BACOLOD CITY – The local weather bureau has hoisted Storm Signal No. 2 over six cities and four towns in Negros Occidental as Typhoon Tisoy barrels its way across the Philippines.

Scenes from the BREDCO Port in Bacolod City where fast ferries and roll on, roll off or RoRo vessels are grounded by the Coast Guard as Typhoon Tisoy continues to move. | Photos by Darlwin T. Sales
Scenes from the BREDCO Port in Bacolod City where fast ferries and roll on, roll off or RoRo vessels are grounded by the Coast Guard as Typhoon Tisoy continues to move. | Photos by Darlwin T. Sales

PAGASA, in its 2pm briefing today, 2 December 2019, identified the areas as the cities of Talisay, Silay, Victorias, Cadiz, Sagay, and Escalante, and Calatrava, EB Magalona, Manapla, and Toboso.

Tisoy was located based on the Virac Doppler radar station at 195 kilometers east of Juban, Sorsogon with maximum sustained winds of 150 kilometers per hour near the center and gustiness of up to 185 kilometers per hour.

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The Official Gazzette defines public storm warning signals as follows:

Public Storm Warning Signals are raised to warn the public of incoming weather disturbances. Once a Storm Signal is raised, conditions are not yet necessarily felt in the given area. The following are the lead times for issuing a Public Storm Signal:

SIGNAL NO. 1: The weather disturbance is expected in 36 hours once Public Storm Warning Signal No. 1 is raised.

SIGNAL NO. 2: The weather disturbance is expected in 24 hours once Public Storm Warning Signal No. 2 is raised.

SIGNAL NO. 3: The weather disturbance is expected in 18 hours once Public Storm Warning Signal No. 3 is raised.

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SIGNAL NO. 4: The weather disturbance is expected in 12 hours once Public Storm Warning Signal No. 4 is raised.

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Julius D. Mariveles
An amateur cook who has a mean version of humba, the author has recently tried to make mole negra, the Mexican sauce he learned by watching shows of master chef Rick Bayless. A journalist since 19, he has worked in the newsrooms of radio, local papers, and Manila-based news organizations. A stroke survivor, he now serves as executive editor of DNX.

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