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HomeDOFTRAIL OF DESTRUCTION: A storm's aftermath in 14 photos

TRAIL OF DESTRUCTION: A storm’s aftermath in 14 photos

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SPRAWLED, WOUNDED. Tacloban City, one of the hardest-hit areas by Typhoon Yolanda, from above a week after the superstorm struck, leaving thousands dead and a million displaced seven years ago. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles
SPRAWLED, WOUNDED. Tacloban City, one of the hardest-hit areas by Typhoon Yolanda, from above a week after the superstorm struck, leaving thousands dead and a million displaced seven years ago. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

The remains of the arrival area of the Daniel Z. Romualdez Airport in Tacloban City looks like a grafitti wall a week after the superstorm, Yolanda (international codename Ruby) struck the Philippines, displacing at least a million in the Visayas group of islands alone. Close to 7,000 are believed to have been killed, according to government estimates. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles
The remains of the arrival area of the Daniel Z. Romualdez Airport in Tacloban City looks like a grafitti wall a week after the superstorm, Yolanda (international codename Ruby) struck the Philippines, displacing at least a million in the Visayas group of islands alone. Close to 7,000 are believed to have been killed, according to government estimates. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

A WEEK AFTER 8 November 2007, some dead bodies placed in bags, have yet to be collected in Tacloban City after superstorm Yolanda struck the Philippines. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles
A WEEK AFTER 8 November 2007, some dead bodies placed in bags, have yet to be collected in Tacloban City after superstorm Yolanda struck the Philippines. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

DEBRIS, LOTS OF DEBRIS. Lots of loading and disposing was one of the urgent tasks in Tacloban City, as shown in this photo taken a week after the superstorm struck the country. Tacloban was among the hardest hit areas in the Visayas. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles
DEBRIS, LOTS OF DEBRIS. Lots of loading and disposing was one of the urgent tasks in Tacloban City, as shown in this photo taken a week after the superstorm struck the country. Tacloban was among the hardest hit areas in the Visayas. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

MEMORIES OF A VILLAGE. These are among the remains of what used to be a community in Kawayan, Tacloban City a week after superstorm Yolanda struck the Philippines on 8 November 2013. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles
MEMORIES OF A VILLAGE. These are among the remains of what used to be a community in Kawayan, Tacloban City a week after superstorm Yolanda struck the Philippines on 8 November 2013. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

BUT FIRST THE MOBILE PHONES. Residents in Tacloban City line up to avail of free charging services being offered by a telephone company. This photo was taken a week after Yolanda left a trail of destruction in the country, killing at least 7,000 people. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles
BUT FIRST THE MOBILE PHONES. Residents in Tacloban City line up to avail of free charging services being offered by a telephone company. This photo was taken a week after Yolanda left a trail of destruction in the country, killing at least 7,000 people. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

A child looks as if he is pondering what the future holds in this photo taken at the Daniel Z. Romualdez Airport in Tacloban City a week after Yolanda left a trail of destruction in the Philippines. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles
A child looks as if he is pondering what the future holds in this photo taken at the Daniel Z. Romualdez Airport in Tacloban City a week after Yolanda left a trail of destruction in the Philippines. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

VILLAGE 88, only several kilometers away from the Daniel Z. Romualdez Airport is a jumble of debris and rubble and anxious survivors a week after the horror that was Yolanda. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles
VILLAGE 88, only several kilometers away from the Daniel Z. Romualdez Airport is a jumble of debris and rubble and anxious survivors a week after the horror that was Yolanda. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

HELP ARRIVES. Officials of Village 88 distribute help from an international NGO a week after Yolanda struck the Philippines, destroying lives and property with its strong winds. These aid packages included essential stuff like water and sleeping mats, basic needs for survivors who continue to cope with the effects of the storm. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles
HELP ARRIVES. Officials of Village 88 distribute help from an international NGO a week after Yolanda struck the Philippines, destroying lives and property with its strong winds. These aid packages included essential stuff like water and sleeping mats, basic needs for survivors who continue to cope with the effects of the storm. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

HELP ARRIVES. Officials of Village 88 distribute help from an international NGO a week after Yolanda struck the Philippines, destroying lives and property with its strong winds. These aid packages included essential stuff like water and sleeping mats, basic needs for survivors who continue to cope with the effects of the storm. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles
HELP ARRIVES. Officials of Village 88 distribute help from an international NGO a week after Yolanda struck the Philippines, destroying lives and property with its strong winds. These aid packages included essential stuff like water and sleeping mats, basic needs for survivors who continue to cope with the effects of the storm. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

BENEATH THIS picture of destruction are dead bodies that have yet to be retrieved in Village 88, Tacloban City a week after Yolanda hit the Philippines. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles
BENEATH THIS picture of destruction are dead bodies that have yet to be retrieved in Village 88, Tacloban City a week after Yolanda hit the Philippines. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

COPING. The altar of the Palo Metropolitan Cathedral became a home for this child and her family a week after superstorm Yolanda struck the Philippines. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles
COPING. The altar of the Palo Metropolitan Cathedral became a home for this child and her family a week after superstorm Yolanda struck the Philippines. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

CHILDREN head home after getting food packs from a government aid station in Tacloban City. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles
CHILDREN head home after getting food packs from a government aid station in Tacloban City. | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

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Julius D. Mariveles
An amateur cook who has a mean version of humba, the author has recently tried to make mole negra, the Mexican sauce he learned by watching shows of master chef Rick Bayless. A journalist since 19, he has worked in the newsrooms of radio, local papers, and Manila-based news organizations. A stroke survivor, he now serves as executive editor of DNX.

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