Tuesday, May 18, 2021
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HomeCOVID-19SURVIVING COVID: Running and photography to keep one's sanity

SURVIVING COVID: Running and photography to keep one’s sanity

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BACOLOD CITY, Negros Occidental, Philippines – John Julien Gadian knows a lot about cheese.

And whiskey.

He used to host libations at home where guests are treated to upscaled pica pica, like Sage Darby, cheddar, pepper jacks or cheddar cheeses with saucissons or other charcuterie stuff.

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He prefers whiskey. Strong stuff.

Until about a year ago when he discovered running.

Sunset at BREDCO. | Photo by John Julien Gadian
Sunset at BREDCO. | Photo by John Julien Gadian

Since then, John Julien Gadian had been running half-marathons, marathons or simply running in parks, ovals, in any place where soles can meet ground or concrete.

The series of lockdowns here may have cooled his running shoes for a while but the recent easing of quarantines has made him return to the field.

Green against blue. Like an ode to life. | Photo by John Julien Gadian
Green against blue. Like an ode to life. | Photo by John Julien Gadian

Apart from running, he has also gone back to street photography.

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To him, photography “is a very interesting hobby which covers a wide spectrum of life” that blends the surroundings and one’s imagination.

After being isolated, John says it has led him “rediscover and appreciate the living things around like the birds, butterflies, insects and flowers.”

Tonkotsu ramen. A creation of and shot by the cook and photographer. | Photo by John Julien Gadian
Tonkotsu ramen. A creation of and shot by the cook and photographer. | Photo by John Julien Gadian

He even found a new interest: shooting the moon.

With the isolation came a renewed interest in cooking, he confesses.

John has ventured into Japanese cuisine and has done his own version of Tonkotsu ramen.

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He has also gone into what he describes as “concocting” cold and hot beverages.

With the renewed interest in the kitchen came another sub-interest: food photography.

In the end, to John, “getting busy with working on the different aspects of photography really helped in dealing with the stress and boredom of isolation.”

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Julius D. Mariveles
An amateur cook who has a mean version of humba, the author has recently tried to make mole negra, the Mexican sauce he learned by watching shows of master chef Rick Bayless. A journalist since 19, he has worked in the newsrooms of radio, local papers, and Manila-based news organizations. A stroke survivor, he now serves as executive editor of DNX.

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