Tuesday, March 2, 2021
Advertisements
Home Crime Kaishek killers wanted him dead

Kaishek killers wanted him dead

Advertisements

BACOLOD CITY – Of the five bullets fired at the running vehicle of Robert “Kaishek” L. Tan yesterday, 15 December, four hit their mark.

A BTAO personnel prepares to tow the vehicle of businessman Robert Tan, who was shot last 14 December at Greensville I, Barangay Estefania.  | Photo by Richard D. Meriveles
A BTAO personnel prepares to tow the vehicle of businessman Robert “Kaishek” Tan, who was shot last 14 December at Greensville I, Barangay Estefania. | Photo by Richard D. Meriveles

His head.

As the murder reached its first 24-hour cycle, probers here are slowly piecing together forensic evidences that could help them reconstruct the event based on pieces left at the scene.

Advertisements

Like the lone dud among five spent shells, possibly from a. 45 caliber pistol found on the street near the victim’s car, a grey Nissan Sentra sedan.

Or the five bullet holes on the driver side window.

And the lone bullet hole on the rear right passenger window of the car.

All these, as of now, indicate a “professional hit,” that those who ordered Tan killed “really wanted him dead.”

The bullet holes, for example, showed there was a “grouping of shots.”

Advertisements

In shooter’s lingo, the grouping indicates the accuracy of the weapon or the skill of the shooter.

The placement of the shots are measured in what is called as MOA or minute of angle.

Simply put, the closer the shots, the more accurate the weapon or the more skilled the shooter.

The shots fired at the window of Kaishek Tan indicated that the shooter was skilled, considering the fact that he might have been shooting one-handed at a moving vehicle and he himself was riding on the back of a moving one, Pico said.

The dud also tells a story.

Advertisements

What happened was the shooter heard the click of the firing pin on a bullet that did not explode, racked (or more known as chambered) his or her firearm to clear the dud and kept on firing.

All while balancing himself or herself on the back of a motorcycle.

And the lone bullet hole at the back?

"They wanted him dead," the investigator in charge of the shooting of businessman Kaishek Tan said.  All indications hint that the hit on Tan was meticulously planned. | Photo by Richard D. Meriveles
“They wanted him dead,” the investigator in charge of the shooting of businessman Kaishek Tan said. All indications hint that the hit on Tan was meticulously planned. | Photo by Richard D. Meriveles

“It is possible there was a third killer who waited by the roadside,” Pico said.

A skilled shooter, a gunman who could shoot under pressure, superior force.

All these, Pico said, tend to indicate the hit on Tan was meticulously planned, the surveillance top notch, all done by professionals.

“They wanted him dead and they did it but we will not stop until we get them,” Pico said.

Advertisements
Julius D. Mariveles
Julius D. Mariveles
An amateur cook who has a mean version of humba, the author has recently tried to make mole negra, the Mexican sauce he learned by watching shows of master chef Rick Bayless. A journalist since 19, he has worked in the newsrooms of radio, local papers, and Manila-based news organizations. A stroke survivor, he now serves as executive editor of DNX.

2 COMMENTS

Leave a Reply

Latest News

Advertisements

TRENDING